Treating Lyme disease, a comprehensive approach

Lyme disease is the most common vector-borne disease in the United States. Many people have Lyme disease without experiencing any discomfort from symptoms. Many others are struggling with complex symptoms of Lyme, but are unaware that they are infected, and so are not getting treatment. The social/political/medical/legal mess that is Lyme disease evaluation and treatment in the U.S. needs to be resolved, but is not a topic of this article. Nor is this a guide for which medications to take. You need to find health professionals experienced with treating Lyme to help you decide your individual protocol.

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Why do we need dietary supplements?

We tend to eat based on what we prefer, and our preference is often based on flavor and convenience rather than on nutrient richness. Basically, this is a result of affluence; we have many choices to choose from, rather than just what’s available locally and seasonally. (It is one of our culture’s ironies that local seasonal food has become the most expensive, but greater demand is helping to make it more affordable.)

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"Friendly" bacteria and probiotics

We have over 500 species (strains) of beneficial bacteria in our body. We actually have more bacteria cells in our body than human cells! Most of these bacteria help us digest food and fight off pathogens. They also protect parts of our body from our own secretions (for example the intestinal membrane from caustic bile). Probiotics and prebiotics are substances which stimulate the growth of these microorganisms.

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Maintain your health during long-term antibiotic use

Before 2005, my only patients on long-term antibiotics were HIV patients. Recently, I have noticed more common use of long-term antibiotics. We have increasing numbers of infectious diseases that are resistant to conventional antibiotic treatment. Lyme disease, Cat-scratch disease and other infectious diseases are on the rise. The precautions I recommend here are for my Lyme disease patients who are on long-term antibiotics. If you have been prescribed long-term use of antibiotics for any reason, it is my hope that this article will inspire you to consider taking additional precautions to maintain your health.

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Wind-cold, wind-heat

There are two major types of common colds, and in the Chinese medical language, two names: wind-cold and wind-heat. Wind, cold and heat are three common pathogens which can enter the body from the exterior. Chills, aversion to cold, stiffness (especially of the neck), headache, and white or clear-colored phlegm are signs of wind-cold. Sore throat, feeling warm and/or agitated (whether or not there is a fever), yellow or green-colored phlegm, and aversion to heat are some indications of wind-heat. A third type of cold, which usually occurs in the autumn, is wind dryness. There may be a combination of fever and chills with a dry throat and dry cough.

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